Panic Attacks and Sleep Apnea

Roughly 3% or more of American adults are living with a panic disorder. Many of these adults experience nocturnal panic attacks that could be a result of undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea. A panic disorder is when a person frequently experiences debilitating anxiety and fear without reasonable cause.  Symptoms of a panic disorder can include headache, dizziness, difficulty breathing, hyperventilation and elevated heart rate. The symptoms of a panic disorder are similar to that of obstructive sleep apnea especially when experienced nocturnally. If a person suddenly awakens from a deep sleep with chest pain and difficulty breathing, it can leave that …

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Summer Sleep Tips

The summer often brings a change in the weather and a change in our routines. For those with a sleep disorder, this can mean a disruption to healthy sleep patterns. Here are a few tips to maintain restful nights throughout the summer months. Don’t Over Indulge Summer is a time of celebration. Summer picnics and parties often include alcoholic beverages. Too much drinking can cause fragmented sleep that will not leave you rested in the morning. Drink modest amounts early in the evening leaving plenty of time for water before bed. Eating Before Bed The days stay lighter much later …

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African Americans may be at greater risk of OSA

Research collected by the National Institute of Health through their Jackson (Mississippi) Heart Study represents the sleep data of 825 African Americans with an average age of 63, and two-thirds of which were female. The data shows an increased incidence of sleep disorder related health problems such as obesity, diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease in the African American participants. Further, three out of four participants were also found to have obstructive sleep apnea, based on an AHI level above 5. Yet only 2.1% of these participants had received a sleep apnea diagnosis from a physician, prior to this study. Researchers …

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What Would Happen if You Didn’t Sleep?!

Check out this TED-Ed quick video (less than 5 minutes) on What Would Happen if You Didn’t Sleep?! Wow, do our bodies need quality sleep! In the United States, it’s estimated that 30 percent of adults and 66 percent of adolescents are regularly sleep-deprived. This isn’t just a minor inconvenience: staying awake can cause serious bodily harm. TED-Ed and Claudia Aguirre show what happens to your body and brain when you skip sleep.

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Sleep Gives Pro Players an Edge

Having the best players is no longer enough for major league baseball teams. Teams must also look for advantages to keep their players ready to perform as often as possible. The Boston Red Sox feel that adequate sleep is just the advantage their team needs. “We consider sleep to be one of the most important activities we do as human beings,” said Red Sox head trainer Brad Pearson. “It is while we sleep that peak physical and mental recovery occurs. While this is important to us all, it is imperative in a sport such as baseball, where the players are …

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Managing Stress for Better Sleep

Is stress keeping you up at night? If so, follow these steps to reduce stress and improve the quality of your sleep. Identify your stressors and work toward eliminating them. Do you struggle to make ends meet? Do you live with pain? Do you dislike your boss? These are common stressors that can impact your sleep. Talk about your stressors with the people who care for you. Practice positive thinking to improve how you feel and to reduce stress levels. Avoid negative thoughts such as “I’m a horrible parent” or “We’ll never get out of this mess.” Stay active. Exercise …

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Being a “Night Owl” may be Encoded in our Genes

People with a natural inclination to go to bed later and wake up later than what is typically considered normal (a.k.a Night Owls) are often diagnosed with Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder (DSPD). Their 24 hour sleep-wake cycle is delayed, making them energetic long after most people have fallen asleep. DSPD is estimated to affect 15 percent of the U.S. population. Researchers out of Rockefeller University report they have discovered a genetic variant of the CRY1 gene which actually slows the internal biological clock. This “clock” controls the circadian rhythms, which are the somatic mechanisms within all living creatures that controls patterns …

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